MDA Bibliography

This bibliography contains studies that report a multidimensional analysis (Biber, 1988) including unpublished manuscripts, research articles, books, MA Theses and PhD Dissertations. This is part of a methodological synthesis project Margaret Wood and I have been working on in the past years.

We have a presentation about it at AAAL 2020, you could check it out here and a paper in the Journal of Research Design and Statistics in Linguistics and Communication Science.

Contributing to the bibliography

If you know of any other studies employing multidimensional analysis that are not currently listed in our bibliography, please let us know here – MDA Bib. Thank you in advance for your assistance.

Latest Update: 10 October 2021

Bibliography of Multidimensional Analyses

  1. Aguado-Jiménez, P., Pérez-Paredes, P., & Sánchez, P. (2012). Exploring the use of multidimensional analysis of learner language to promote register awareness. System, 40(1), 90-103.
  2. Ahmad, S., & Ali, S. (2019). Linguistic Variation across Press Reportage in Pakistani Print Media: A Multi-Dimensional Analysis. Journal of Media Studies, 32(2), 135-163.
  3. Ahmad, S., & Mahmood, M. A. (2015). Comparing Explicit Features of Pakistani Press Reportage with British Press Reportage: A Multi-Dimensional Analysis. NUML Journal of Critical Inquiry, 13(2), 1-31.
  4. Ahmad, S., & Mahmood, A. (2016). Linguistic Variation among Newspapers in Pakistani Print Media: A Multidimensional Analysis. Kashmir Journal of Language Research, 19(1), 135-156.
  5. Ahmad, N. N., & Shakir, A. (2014). Significance of Non-Narrative Features in Online University Prospectus of Pakistan: A Corpus-Based Investigation. Research on Humanities and Social Sciences, 4(19), 128-138.
  6. Al‐Surmi, M. (2012). Authenticity and TV shows: A multidimensional analysis perspective. TESOL Quarterly, 46(4), 671-694.
  7. Ali, S., & Ahmad, S. (2016). Discourse style variation among the leading novelists of Pakistani fiction in English: A multidimensional analysis. ELF Annual Research Journal, 18(1), 227-246.
  8. Ali, S., & Ahmad, S. (2019). Bilingual Creativity and World Englishes: A Comparative Multidimensional Analysis of Pakistani English General Fiction with British General Fiction. Kashmir Journal of Language Research, 22(1), 121-144.
  9. Ali, M., & Sheeraz, M. (2018). Diachronic Variations in Pakistani English Newspaper Editorials: A Case Study. NUML Journal of Critical Inquiry, 16(2), 1-VIII.
  10. Ali, S., & Shehzad, W. (2019). Linguistic variation among South Asian Englishes: A corpus-based multidimensional analysis. Journal of Nusantara Studies, 4(1), 69-92. http://dx.doi.org/10.24200/jonus.vol4iss1pp69-92
  11. Alvi, U. F. (2017). Linguistics Analysis of Pakistani English Newspaper Editorials: A Multidimensional Approach [Doctoral dissertation, Government College University, Faisalabad]. Pakistan Research Repository.
  12. Alvi, U., Mehmood, M. A., & Rasool, S. (2016). A Multidimensional Analysis of Pakistani Press Editorials. Dialogue (Pakistan), 11(3), 270-284.
  13. Amjad, T., & Shakir, A. (2014). Study of information generating linguistic features in online university prospectuses. Research on Humanities and Social Sciences, 4(25), 122-128.
  14. Anwar, B., & Maiyain, S. (2017). Informational and Interactional Features of Written and Spoken Pakistani English. Kashmir Journal of Language Research, 20(1), 1-9.
  15. Asención-Delaney, Y. (2014). A Multi-Dimensional analysis of advanced written L2 Spanish. In T Berber-Sardinha & M. Veirano Pinto (Eds.) Multi-Dimensional Analysis, 25 years on: A tribute to Douglas Biber (pp. 239 – 266). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  16. Asención-Delaney, Y., & Collentine, J. (2011). A multidimensional analysis of a written L2 Spanish corpus. Applied Linguistics, 32(3), 299-322.
  17. Asghar, S. A., Mahmood, M. A., & Asghar, Z. M. (2018). A multidimensional analysis of Pakistani legal English. International Journal of English Linguistics, 8(5), 215-229.
  18. Atkinson, D. (1996). The philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London, 1675–1975: A sociohistorical discourse analysis. Language in Society, 25(3), 333-371.
  19. Atkinson, D. (1992) The evolution of medical research writing from 1735 to 1985: The case of the Edinburgh Medical Journal. Applied Linguistics, 13(4), 337-374.
  20. Atkinson, D. (2014). Scientific discourse across history: a combined multi-dimensional/rhetorical analysis of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. In S. Conrad & D. Biber (Eds.), Variation in English: Multi-Dimensional Studies, (pp. 45 – 65). Routledge.
  21. Azher, M., & Mehmood, M. A. (2016). Exploring Variation across Pakistani Academic Writing: A Multidimensional Analysis. NUML Journal of Critical Inquiry, 14(2), 86-118.
  22. Azher, M., Mehmood, M. A., & Shah, S. I. (2018). Linguistic Variation across Research Sections of Pakistan Academic Writing: A Multidimensional Analysis. International Journal of English Linguistics, 8(1), 30-43.
  23. Aziz, M. A. (2019). A Multi-Dimensional Analysis of Pakistani Learner Writing [Doctoral dissertation, Government College University, Faisalabad]. Pakistan Research Repository.
  24. Aziz, A., Pathan, H., & Ali, S. (2017). Linguistic Variation across Major Disciplinary Groups of Pakistani Academic Writing: Multidimensional Analysis of Doctoral Theses. ARIEL-An International Research Journal of English Language and Literature, 27, 27-60.
  25. Baker, W. (2001). Gender and bilinguals’ creativity. World Englishes, 20(3), 321-339.
  26. Baker, W., & Eggington, W. G. (1999). Bilingual creativity, multidimensional analysis, and world Englishes. World Englishes, 18(3), 343-358.
  27. Bértoli-Dutra, P. (2014). Multi-dimensional analysis of pop songs. In T. Berber-Sardinha & M. Veirano Pinto (Eds.), Multi-Dimensional Analysis, 25 years on: A tribute to Douglas Biber (pp. 149 – 176). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  28. Bértoli, P. (2018). Song lyrics: From multi-dimensional analysis to the foreign language classroom. In V. Werner (Ed.), The Language of Pop Culture (pp. 210-229). Routledge.
  29. Besnier, N. (1988). The linguistic relationships of spoken and written Nukulaelae registers. Language, 64(4), 707-736.
  30. Biber, D. (1984). A Model of Textual Relations within the Written and Spoken Modes [Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Southern California].
  31. Biber, D. (1985). Investigating macroscopic textual variation through multi‑feature/ multi‑dimensional analyses. Linguistics, 23, 337-360.
  32. Biber, D. (1986). Spoken and written textual dimensions in English: Resolving the contradictory findings. Language, 62(2), 384-414.
  33. Biber, D. (1986). On The Investigation of Spoken/Written Differences 1. Studia Linguistica, 40(1), 1-21.
  34. Biber, D. (1988). Variation across speech and writing. Cambridge University Press.
  35. Biber, D. (1992). On the complexity of discourse complexity: A multidimensional analysis. Discourse Processes, 15(2), 133-163.
  36. Biber, D. (1995). Dimensions of register variation: A cross-linguistic comparison. Cambridge University Press.
  37. Biber, D. (2003). Variation among university spoken and written registers: A new multi-dimensional analysis. Corpus analysis: language structure and language use, 46, 47-70.
  38. Biber, D. (2014). ‘On the complexity of discourse complexity: A multidimensional analysis. In S. Conrad & D. Biber (Eds.). Variation in English: Multidimensional Studies, (pp. 215–40). Longman.
  39. Biber, D.  (2004).  Conversation text types:  A multi-dimensional analysis.  In G. Purnelle, C. Fairon, and A. Dister (Eds.), Le poids des mots:  Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on the Statistical Analysis of Textual Data, (pp. 15- 34).  Louvain: Presses universitaires de Louvain.
  40. Biber, D. (2008). Corpus-based analyses of discourse: Dimensions of variation in conversation. In V. Bhatia, J. Flowerdew & R. H. Jones (Eds.). Advances in discourse studies (pp. 110-124). Routledge.
  41. Biber, D.  (2007).  On the complexity of discourse complexity:  A multidimensional analysis.  In T.A. van Dijk (Ed.), Discourse Studies [Vol. 1] (pp. 127-157). Sage.
  42. Biber, D., & Burges, J. (2000). Historical change in the language use of women and men: Gender differences in dramatic dialogue. Journal of English Linguistics, 28(1), 21-37.
  43. Biber, D., & Burges, J. (2014). Historical shifts in the language of women and men: Gender differences in dramatic dialogue. In D. Biber & S. Conrad, Variation in English: Multidimensional Studies. (pp. 157-170) Routledge.
  44. Biber, D., & Conrad, S. (2009). Multidimensional Patterns of register variation. In D. Biber & S. Conrad, Register, Genre, and Style (pp. 215-252). Cambridge University Press.
  45. Biber, D., Csomay, E., Jones, J. K., & Keck, C. (2004). A corpus linguistic investigation of vocabulary-based discourse units in university registers. In U. Connor & T. A. Upton. Applied Corpus Linguistics (pp. 53-72). Brill Rodopi.
  46. Biber, D., Conrad, S., Reppen, R., Byrd, P., & Helt, M. (2002a). Speaking and writing in the university: A multidimensional comparison. TESOL Quarterly, 36(1), 9-48.
  47. Biber, D., Conrad, S., Reppen, R., Byrd, P., Helt, M., Clark, V., Cortes, V., Csomay, E., & Urzua, A. (2004). Representing language use in the university: Analysis of the TOEFL 2000 spoken and written academic language corpus. Educational Testing Service.
  48. Biber, D., Davies, M., Jones, J. K., & Tracy-Ventura, N. (2006). Spoken and written register variation in Spanish: A multi-dimensional analysis. Corpora, 1(1), 1-37.
  49. Biber, D., & Egbert, J. (2016a). Register variation on the searchable web: A multi-dimensional analysis. Journal of English Linguistics, 44(2), 95-137.
  50. Biber, D., & Egbert, J.  (2016b). Using multi-dimensional analysis to study register variation on the searchable web. Corpus Linguistics Research, 2, 1-23.
  51. Biber, D., & Egbert, J. (2018). Register variation online. Cambridge University Press.
  52. Biber, D., Egbert, J., & Zhang, M. (2017). Using Corpus-Based Analysis to Study Register and Dialect Variation on the Searchable Web. In E. Friginal (Ed.), Studies in Corpus-Based Sociolinguistics (pp. 83-111). Routledge.
  53. Biber, D., & Finegan, E. (1988). Historical drift in three English genres. In J. E. Alatis (Ed.), Georgetown University Round Table on Language and Linguistics 1989 (pp. 22-36). Georgetown University Press.
  54. Biber, D., & Finegan, E. (1988). Drift in three English genres from the 18th to the 20th centuries: A multidimensional approach. In M. Kytö, O. Ihalainen & M. Rissanen, Corpus Linguistics, Hard and Soft. Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on English Language Research on Computerized Corpora (pp. 83-101). Brill.
  55. Biber, D., & Finegan, E. (1989). Drift and the evolution of English style: A history of three genres. Language, 65(3), 487-517.
  56. Biber, D., & Finegan, E. (1994). Intra-textual variation within medical research articles. Corpus-based research into language, 12, 201-222.
  57. Biber, D. &  Finegan, E., (2014a). Diachronic relations among speech-based and written registers in English. In D. Biber & S. Conrad (Eds.), Variation in English: Multi-dimensional studies (pp. 66-83). Routledge.
  58. Biber, D., & Finegan, E. (2014b). Intra-textual variation within medical research articles. In D. Biber & S. Conrad (Eds.), Variation in English: Multi-Dimensional Studies (pp. 108-122). Routledge.
  59. Biber, D., & Gray, B. (2013). Discourse characteristics of writing and speaking task types on the TOEFL ibt® test: a lexico‐grammatical analysis. ETS Research Report Series, 2013(1), i-128.
  60. Biber, D., Gray, B., & Staples, S. (2016). Predicting patterns of grammatical complexity across language exam task types and proficiency levels. Applied Linguistics, 37(5), 639-668.
  61. Biber, D., & Hared, M. (1992). Dimensions of register variation in Somali. Language Variation and Change, 4(1), 41-75.
  62. Biber, D. & Hared, M. (1994). Linguistic Correlates of the Transition to Literacy in Somali: Language Adaptation in Six Press Registers. In B. Biber & E. Finegan (Eds.), Sociolinguistic Perspectives on Register (pp.182-216). Oxford University Press.
  63. Biber, D., & Kurjian, J. (2007). Towards a taxonomy of web registers and text types: A multi-dimensional analysis. In M. Hundt, N. Nesselhauf & C. Biewer (Eds.), Corpus linguistics and the web (pp. 109-131). Brill Rodopi.
  64. Biber, D., & Tracy-Ventura, N. (2007) Dimensions of register variation in Spanish. In G. Parodi (Ed.), Working with Spanish Corpora: Corpus and Discourse (pp. 54-89). Continuum.
  65. Brun-Mercer, N. (2018). Nations United through Discourse: A Corpus Analysis of UN General Assembly Addresses [Doctoral dissertation, Northern Arizona University].
  66. Cao, Y., & Xiao, R. (2013). A multi-dimensional contrastive study of English abstracts by native and non-native writers. Corpora, 8(2), 209-234.
  67. Chaves, A. P., Doerry, E., Egbert, J., & Gerosa, M. (2019). It’s How You Say It: Identifying Appropriate Register for Chatbot Language Design. Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction (pp. 102-109).
  68. Chen, M. (2018). A comparison of the situational and linguistic features of high-profile criminal trials and TV series courtroom trials [Doctoral dissertation, Northern Arizona University].
  69. Collins, P., Korhonen, M., Kotze, H., Smith, A., & Yao, X. (2021). Diachronic register change: A corpus-based study of Australian English, with comparisons across British and American English. Register Studies, 3(1), 33-87.
  70. Collot, M., & Belmore, N. (1996). A new variety of English. Computer-mediated communication: Linguistic, social, and cross-cultural perspectives, 39, 13-28.
  71. Connor, U. (1995). Examining syntactic variation across three English-speaking nationalities through a multi-feature/multi-dimensional approach. In D. L. Rubin (Ed.), Composing social identity in written language (pp. 75-88). Routledge.
  72. Connor-Linton, J. (1999). Competing communicative styles and crosstalk: A multi-feature analysis. Language in Society, 28(1), 25-56.
  73. Connor-Linton, J. (2014). Author’s style and world view: A comparison about American nuclear arms policy. In D. Biber & S. Conrad (Eds.), Variation in English: Multi-Dimensional studies (pp. 84-93). Routledge.
  74. Connor, U., & Upton, T. (2003). Linguistic dimensions of direct mail letters. In P. Leistyna & C. F. Meyer (Eds.), Corpus Analysis (pp. 71-86). Brill Rodopi.
  75. Connor, U., & Upton, T. (2004). The genre of grant proposals: A corpus linguistic analysis. Discourse in the professions: Perspectives from corpus linguistics, 24, 235-256.
  76. Conrad, S. M. (1996). Investigating academic texts with corpus-based techniques: An example from biology. Linguistics and education, 8(3), 299-326.
  77. Conrad, S. (2014). Variation among disciplinary texts: A comparison of textbooks and journal articles in biology and history. In S. Conrad & D. Biber (Eds.), Variation in English: Multi-dimensional studies (pp. 94-107). Routledge.
  78. Crosthwaite, P. (2016). A longitudinal multidimensional analysis of EAP writing: Determining EAP course effectiveness. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 22, 166-178.
  79. Crosthwaite, P., & Cheung, L. (2019). Learning the Language of Dentistry: Disciplinary corpora in the teaching of English for Specific Academic Purposes (Vol. 93). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  80. Csomay, E. (2005). Linguistic variation within university classroom talk: A corpus-based perspective. Linguistics and Education, 15(3), 243-274.
  81. Csomay, E. (2015). A corpus-based analysis of linguistic variation in teacher and student presentations in university settings. In V. Cortes&E. Csomay (Eds). Corpus-based Research in Applied Linguistics (pp. 1-24). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  82. Csomay, E., & Wu, S. M. (2020). Language variation in university classrooms: A corpus-driven geographical perspective. Register Studies, 2(1), 131-165.
  83. Cvrček, V., Komrsková, Z., Lukeš, D., Poukarová, P., Řehořková, A., & Zasina, A. J. (2018). From extra-to intratextual characteristics: Charting the space of variation in Czech through MDA. Corpus Linguistics and Linguistic Theory.
  84. Cvrček, V., Komrsková, Z., Lukeš, D., Poukarová, P., Řehořková, A., & Zasina, A. J. (2018). Variabilita češtiny: multidimenzionální analýza. Slovo a slovesnost, 79(4).
  85. Cvrček, V., Komrsková, Z., Lukeš, D., Poukarová, P., Řehořková, A., Zasina, A. J., & Benko, V. (2020). Comparing web-crawled and traditional corpora. Language Resources and Evaluation, 1-33.
  86. Cvrček, V., Laubeová, Z., Lukeš, D., Poukarová, P., Řehořková, A., & Zasina, A. J. (2020). Author and register as sources of variation: A corpus-based study using elicited texts. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 25(4), 461-488.
  87. de Souza, R. C. (2014). Dimensions of variation in TIME magazine. In T Berber-Sardinha & M. Veirano Pinto (Eds.) Multi-Dimensional Analysis, 25 years on: A tribute to Douglas Biber (pp. 177 – 197). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  88. Delfino, M. C. N. (2016). Uso de música para o ensino de inglês como língua estrangeira em um ambiente baseado em corpus [Doctoral dissertation, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo]. TEDE.
  89. Dunagan, T., & Sami, G. (2014) Informational and Involved Production Features of Asian Englishes: A Corpus-Based Comparison [Unpublished manuscript]
  90. Egbert, J. (2012). Style in nineteenth century fiction: A multi-dimensional analysis. Scientific Study of Literature, 2(2), 167-198.
  91. Egbert, J. (2014a). Student perceptions of stylistic variation in introductory university textbooks. Linguistics and Education, 25, 64-77.
  92. Egbert, J. (2014). Reader perceptions of linguistic variation in published academic writing. [Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Northern Arizona University].
  93. Egbert, J. (2015). Publication type and discipline variation in published academic writing: Investigating statistical interaction in corpus data. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 20(1), 1-29.
  94. Egbert, J., & LaFlair, G., (in preparation). Linguistic Variation and Text Difficulty: C-test Passages in the Duolingo English Test. [unpublished manuscript]
  95. Egbert, J., & Mahlberg, M. (2020), Fiction – one register or two? Speech and narration in novels. Register Studies, 2(1), 72-101. https://doi.org/10.1075/rs.19006.egb
  96. Ehret, K., Taboada, M (2020) Are online news comments like face-to-face conversation? A multi-dimensional analysis of an emerging register. Register Studies, 2(1), 1-36. https://doi.org/10.1075/rs.19012.ehr
  97. Forchini, P. (2009). Spontaneity in American English: face-to-face and movie conversation compared [Doctoral dissertation, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore Di Milano].
  98. Forchini, P. (2011). Movie conversation: a reflection of face-to-face conversation and a source for teaching spoken language. In Gabriella Di Martino, Linda Lombardo, Silvia Nuccorin (Eds) Papers from the 24th AIA Conference. Challenges for the 21st Century: Dilemmas, Ambiguities, Directions. Vol. 2. Language Studies,Roma: Edizioni Q, 199-206.
  99. Forchini, P. (2012). Movie language revisited. Evidence from multi-dimensional analysis and corpora. Peter Lang.
  100. Forchini, P. (2013). The teaching applicability of movies and the strength of Multi-Dimensional Analysis (MDA). In Amanda C. Murphy & Margherita Ulrych (Eds). Perspectives on Spoken Discourse (pp 81 – 110). Milano: EduCatt.
  101. Forchini, P. (2013). Using movie corpora to explore spoken American English. Evidence from Multi-Dimensional Analysis. In J Bamford, S Cavalieri, G Diani (Eds). Variation and Change in Spoken and Written Discourse: Perspectives from Corpus Linguistics,(pp 123 – 136). Amsterdam / Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
  102. Forchini, P. (2017). A multi-dimensional analysis of legal American English: Real-life and cinematic representations compared. International Journal of Language Studies, 11(3), 133-150.
  103. Forchini, P. (2018). The applicability of movies in legal language teaching: Evidence from Multi-Dimensional Analysis. International Journal of Linguistics 10(6), 245-262.
  104. Forchini, P. (2019). Dimensions “Assembled”: The Nature of Movie Conversation. In Veronica Bonsignori, Gloria Cappelli & Elisa Mattiello (Eds), Worlds of words: complexity, creativity, and conventionality in English language, literature and culture. Volume I: Language. (pp 145-157). Pisa: Pisa university press.
  105. Forchini, P. (2020). Movie discourse: Marvel and DC Studios compared. In Eric Friginal & Jack Hardy (Eds). The Routledge Handbook of Corpus Approaches to Discourse Analysis (pp. 183-201). Routledge.
  106. Forchini, P. (2021) The American Movie Corpus. In P. Forchini, The American Movie Corpus: A Tool for the Development of Spoken Lexico-Grammatical Competence, 9-53. Milano: EDUCatt.
  107. Francis, E. (2018). MisInfoWars: A linguistic analysis of deceptive and credible news [Master’s thesis, University of Victoria]. Summit.
  108. Friginal, E. (2008a). Linguistic variation in the discourse of outsourced call centers. Discourse Studies, 10(6), 715-736.
  109. Friginal, E. (2008). The language of outsourced call centers: A corpus-based study of cross-cultural interaction [Doctoral dissertation, Northern Arizona University].
  110. Friginal, E. (2009a). A corpus-based study of gender and age in blogs. Language Forum, 35(2), 19-38.
  111. Friginal, E. (2009). The Language of Outsourced Call Centers: A corpus-Based Study of Cross Cultural Interaction. John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  112. Friginal, E. (2015). Telephone interactions: A multidimensional comparison. In V. Cortes & E. Csomay (Eds.), Corpus-based research in applied linguistics (pp. 25-48). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  113. Friginal, E. & Biber, D. (2016). Involved and Informational Production Features of Q+A Forum Responses: A Multidimensional Analysis. In P. Baker & J. Egbert (Eds.), Triangulating Methodological Approaches in Corpus Linguistics Research (pp. 73-89). Routledge.
  114. Friginal, E., & Mustafa, S. S. (2016). A comparison of US-based and Iraqi English research article abstracts using corpora. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 25, 45-57.
  115. Friginal, E., & Weigle, S. (2014). Exploring multiple profiles of L2 writing using multi-dimensional analysis. Journal of Second Language Writing, 26, 80-95.
  116. Friginal, E., Mathews, E. & Roberts, J. (2019).  Pilot Controller Communication. In Friginal, E., Mathews, E. & Roberts, J., English in Global Aviation: Context, Research, and Pedagogy (pp. 151-184). Bloomsbury Publishing.
  117. Friginal, E., Pickering, L., & Bruce, C. (2016). Narrative and informational dimensions of AAC discourse in the workplace. In Pickering, L., Friginal, E. & Staples, S. (Eds.). Talking at Work (pp. 27-53). Palgrave Macmillan.
  118. Friginal, E., Waugh, O., & Titak, A. (2017). Linguistic variation in Facebook and Twitter posts. In Friginal, E. (Ed.), Studies in corpus-based sociolinguistics (pp. 342-362). Routledge
  119. Friginal, E., Pearson, P., Di Ferrante, L., Pickering, L., & Bruce, C. (2013). Linguistic Characteristics of AAC Discourse in the Workplace. Discourse Studies, 15 (3), 21-47.
  120. Gardner, S. (2008). Integrating ethnographic, multidimensional, corpus linguistic and systemic functional approaches to genre description: an illustration through university history and engineering assignments. In E. Steiner & S. Neumann (Eds.), Proceedings of the 19th European Systemic Functional Linguistics Conference and Workshop: Data and Interpretation in Linguistic Analysis. http://scidok.sulb.uni-saarland.de/sulb/portal/esflcw
  121. Gardner, S., Nesi, H., & Biber, D. (2018). Discipline, level, genre: Integrating situational perspectives in a new MD analysis of university student writing. Applied Linguistics, 40(4), 646-674.
  122. Geisler, C. (2002). Investigating register variation in nineteenth-century English: A multidimensional compasion. Using corpora to explore linguistic variation, 9, 249.
  123. Gonzalez, Z. M. G. (2019). Linguística de Corpus e a Linguística Forense: a questão da autoria [Doctoral dissertation, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo]. TEDE.
  124. Goulart, L. (2021). Register variation in L1 and L2 student writing: A multidimensional analysis. Register Studies, 3(1), 115-143.
  125. Goźdź-Roszkowski, S. (2011). Patterns of linguistic variation in American legal English: A corpus-based study. Peter Lang.
  126. Gozdz-Roszkowski, S. (2008). Variation across disciplines and genres: A preliminary Multi-dimensional analysis. Corpus Linguistics, Computer Tools, and Applications-State of the Art: PALC 2007, 17, 365-380.
  127. ​​Grabe, W. P. (1984). Towards defining expository prose within a theory of text construction [Doctoral dissertation, University of Southern California]. USC Digital Library.
  128. Gray, B. E. (2011). Exploring academic writing through corpus linguistics: When discipline tells only part of the story [Doctoral dissertation, Northern Arizona University]. ProQuest Dissertation Publishing.
  129. Gray, B. (2013). More than discipline: uncovering multi-dimensional patterns of variation in academic research articles. Corpora, 8(2), 153-181.
  130. Gray, B. (2015). Linguistic variation in research articles: When discipline tells only part of the story (Vol. 71). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  131. Gray, B, Cotos, E., & Smith, J. (2020). Combining rhetorical move analysis with multi-dimensional analysis Research writing across disciplines. In U. Römer, V. Cortes & E. Friginal (Eds.), Advances in Corpus-based Research on Academic Writing(pp. 139-168). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  132. Gray, B., Geluso, J., & Nguyen, P. (2019). The Longitudinal Development of Grammatical Complexity at the Phrasal and Clausal Levels in Spoken and Written Responses to the TOEFL iBT® Test (TOEFL Research Report No. RR-90). Educational Testing Service.
  133. Gregg, N., Coleman, C., Stennett, R. B., & Davis, M. (2002). Discourse complexity of college writers with and without disabilities: A multidimensional analysis. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 35(1), 23-38.
  134. Grieve, J. (2009). A corpus-based regional dialect survey of grammatical variation in written Standard American English [Doctoral dissertation, Northern Arizona University]. ProQuest Dissertation Publishing.
  135. Grieve, J. (2014). A Multi-Dimensional analysis of regional variation in American English. In T Berber-Sardinha & M. Veirano Pinto (Eds.) Multi-Dimensional Analysis, 25 years on: A tribute to Douglas Biber (pp. 3 – 35). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  136. Grieve, J., Biber, D., Friginal, E., & Nekrasova, T. (2011). Variation among blogs:  A multi-dimensional analysis.  In A. Mehler, S. Sharoff, & M. Santini (Eds.), Genres on the Web: Computational Models and Empirical Studies (pp. 303-322). Springer.
  137. Grieve, J., Ruette, T., Speelman, D., & Geeraerts, D. (2017). Social Functional Linguistic Variation in Conversational Dutch. In Studies in Corpus-Based Sociolinguistics (pp. 253-272). Routledge.
  138. Hardy, J. A., & Friginal, E. (2012). Filipino and American online communication and linguistic variation. World Englishes, 31(2), 143-161.
  139. Hardy, J. A., & Friginal, E. (2016). Genre variation in student writing: A multi-dimensional analysis. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 22, 119-131.
  140. Hardy, J. A., & Römer, U. (2013). Revealing disciplinary variation in student writing: A multi-dimensional analysis of the Michigan Corpus of Upper-level Student Papers (MICUSP). Corpora, 8(2), 183–207. http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/cor.2013.0040
  141. He, M. (2017). A Comparative Multidimensional Study of the English Translation of Lunyu (The Analects): A Corpus-based Analysis. GEMA Online® Journal of Language Studies, 17(3), 37-54.
  142. Helt, M. (2014). A multi-dimensional comparison of British and American spoken English. In S. Conrad & D. Biber (Eds.), Variation in English: Multi-dimensional studies (pp. 171-184). Routledge.
  143. Huang, Y., & Ren, W. (2020). A novel multidimensional analysis of writing styles of editorials from China Daily and The New York Times. Lingua, 235, 1-16. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lingua.2019.102781
  144. Hu, X., Xiao, R., & Hardie, A. (2016). How do English translations differ from native English writings?: A multi-feature statistical model for linguistic variation analysis. Corpus Linguistics and Linguistic Theory, 1-36. 10.1515/cllt-2014-0047
  145. Issitt, S. (2017). Evaluating the impact of a professional English for academic purposes programme: A corpus based study [Doctoral dissertation, University of Birmingham]
  146. Iberri-Shea, G. (2011). Speaking in front of the class: a multi-dimensional comparison of university student public speech and university language. Classroom Discourse, 2(2), 251-267.
  147. Jin, B. (2018). A multidimensional analysis of research article discussion sections in the field of chemical engineering. IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, 61(3), 242-256.
  148. Jonsson, E. (2016). Conversational Writing. Peter Lang.
  149. Katinskaya, A., & Sharoff, S. (2015). Applying multi-dimensional analysis to a Russian webcorpus: Searching for evidence of genres. In J. Piskorski, L. Pivovarova, J. Šnajder, H. Tanev & R. Yangarber, The 5th Workshop on Balto-Slavic Natural Language Processing (pp. 65-74). Incoma. https://aclanthology.org/volumes/W15-53/
  150. Kauffmann, C. H. (2005). O Corpus do Jornal: Variação lingüística, gêneros e dimensões da imprensa diária escrita [MA Thesis, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo]
  151. Kauffmann, C. H. (2020). Linguística de corpus e estilo: análises multidimensional e canônica na ficção de Machado de Assis [Doctoral dissertation, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo].
  152. Kauffmann, C., & Berber Sardinha, T. (2021). Brazilian Portuguese literary style. In E. Friginal & J. A. Hardy (Orgs.), The Routledge handbook of corpus approaches to discourse analysis (p. 354–375). Routledge.
  153. Kessapidu, S. (1997). A critical linguistic approach to a corpus of business letters in Greek. Discourse & Society, 8(4), 479-500.
  154. Kim J. Y., & Biber, D. (1994). A corpus-based analysis of register variation in Korean. In . In B. Biber & E. Finegan (Eds.), Sociolinguistic Perspectives on Register (pp.157-181). Oxford University Press.
  155. Kim, J. E., & Nam, H. (2019). How do textual features of L2 argumentative essays differ across proficiency levels? A multidimensional cross-sectional study. Reading and Writing, 32(9), 2251-2279.
  156. Kitjaroenpaiboon, W., & Getkham, K. (2016). Stylistic Patterns in Language Teaching Research Articles: A Multidimensional Analysis. PASAA: Journal of Language Teaching and Learning in Thailand, 52, 169-208.
  157. Kodytek, V. (2007). On the replicability of the Biber model: The case of Czech. Unpublished manuscript.
  158. Kobayashi, Y., & Abe, M. (2014). A machine learning approach to the effects of writing task prompts. Learner Corpus Studies in Asia and the World, 2, 163-175.
  159. Koteyko, I. (2015). The language of press advertising in the UK: A multi-dimensional study. Journal of English Linguistics, 43(4), 259-283.
  160. Kruger, H., & Smith, A. (2018). Colloquialization versus densification in Australian English: a multidimensional analysis of the Australian Diachronic Hansard Corpus (ADHC). Australian Journal of Linguistics, 38(3), 293-328.
  161. Kruger, H., & Van Rooy, B. (2018). Register variation in written contact varieties of English: A multidimensional analysis. English World-Wide, 39(2), 214-242.
  162. Kruger, H., & Van Rooy, B. (2016). Constrained language: A multidimensional analysis of translated English and a non-native indigenised variety of English. English World-Wide, 37(1), 26-57.
  163. Kruger, H., van Rooy, B., & Smith, A. (2019). Register change in the British and Australian Hansard (1901-2015). Journal of English Linguistics, 47(3), 183-220.
  164. LaFlair, G. T., Staples, S., & Yan, X. (2019). Connecting Corpus Linguistics and Assessment. In J. Egbert & P. Baker, Using Corpus Methods to Triangulate Linguistic Analysis (pp. 109-140). Routledge.
  165. LaFlair, G. T., & Staples, S. (2017). Using corpus linguistics to examine the extrapolation inference in the validity argument for a high-stakes speaking assessment. Language Testing, 34(4), 451-475.
  166. Larsson, T; Paquot, M, & Biber, D. (2021). On the importance of register in learner writing: A multi-dimensional approach. In E. Seoane & D. Biber (Eds.), Corpus based approaches to register variation. Amsterdam: Benjamins.
  167. Liimatta, A. (2019). Exploring register variation on Reddit: A multi-dimensional study of language use on a social media website. Register Studies, 1(2), 269-295.
  168. Llosa, L., Grapin, S. E., Friginal, E., Cushing, S. T., & Malone, M. E. (2019). Linguistic Dimensions of TOEFL iBT Essays Compared with Successful Student Disciplinary Writing in the University. TESOL Quarterly, 0(0), 1-15.
  169. Lord, V. B., Davis, B., & Mason, P. (2008). Stance-shifting in language used by sex offenders: Five case studies. Psychology, Crime & Law, 14(4), 357-379.
  170. Moessner, L. (2014). The rise of disciplinary identity. Periphrasis, Replacement and Renewal: Studies in English Historical Linguistics (pp. 286-309). Cambridge Scholar Publishing.
  171. Monaco, L. M. (2016). Chapter One Female Abstract Thinking: The Use of Abstract Style By Late Modern English Women Scientists Leida Maria Monaco. In B. Crespo, I. Moskowich & C. Núñez-Puente (Eds.), Queering Women’s and Gender Studies (pp. 1-192). Cambridge Scholar Publishing
  172. Monaco, L. M. (2016). Was late Modern English scientific writing impersonal?: Comparing Philosophy and Life Sciences texts from the Coruña Corpus. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 21(4), 499-526.
  173. Monaco, L. M. (2017). A multidimensional analysis of late Modern English scientific texts from the” Coruña Corpus” [Doctoral dissertation, Universidade de Coruña]. Repositorio Universidade Coruña.
  174. Mason, P., Davis, B., & Bosley, D. (2005). Stance Analysis: Social Cues and Attitudes. Contemporary Research in E-marketing, 2, 262.
  175. Moran, K. E. (2013). Exploring undergraduate disciplinary writing: Expectations and evidence in psychology and chemistry [Doctoral dissertation, Georgia State University]. ScholarWorks @ Georgia State University.
  176. Murakami, A. (2009). A corpus-based study of English textbooks in Japan and Asian countries: Multidimensional approach [Unpublished master’s thesis]. Tokyo University of Foreign Studies.
  177. Nesi, H., & Gardner, S. (2012). Genres across the disciplines: Student writing in higher education. Cambridge University Press.
  178. Nini, A. (2017). Register variation in malicious forensic texts. International Journal of Speech, Language & the Law, 24(1), 99-126.
  179. Nini, A., & Grant, T. (2013). Bridging the gap between stylistic and cognitive approaches to authorship analysis using Systemic Functional Linguistics and multidimensional analysis. International Journal of Speech, Language & the Law, 20(2), 173-202.
  180. Noor, S., & Shakir, A. (2015). Study of information generating linguistic features in online brands of Pakistani fashion blogs. New Media and Mass Communication, 44(1), 1-7.
  181. Pan, F. (2018). A multidimensional analysis of L1–L2 differences across three advanced levels. Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies, 36(2), 117-131.
  182. Parodi, G. (2007). Variation across registers in Spanish: exploring the El Grial PUCV corpus. In G. Parodi (Ed.), Working with Spanish corpora (pp. 11-53). Bloomsbury.
  183. Pérez-Paredes, P., & Sánchez-Tornel, M. (2015). A multidimensional analysis of learner language during story reconstruction in interviews. In M. Callies & S. Götz, Learner Corpora in Language Testing and Assessment (pp. 141-162). John Benjamins Publishing.
  184. Pérez-Paredes, P., & Sánchez-Tornel, M. (2019). The linguistic dimension of L2 interviews: A multidimensional analysis of native speaker language. Focus on ELT Journal, 1(1), 4-26.
  185. Pinto, M. V.(2014). Dimensions of variation in North American movies. In T Berber-Sardinha & M. Veirano Pinto (Eds.) Multi-Dimensional Analysis, 25 years on: A tribute to Douglas Biber (pp. 109 – 148). John Benjamins Publishing.
  186. Qasim, S., & Shakir, A. (2016). Linguistic variation of Pakistani fiction and non-fiction book blurbs: A multidimensional analysis. ELF Annual Research Journal, 18(1), 185-206.
  187. Qasim, S., Shakir, A., & Qasim, A. B. (2017). Linguistic Analysis of Pakistani Book Blurbs on New Textual Dimensions. NUML Journal of Critical Inquiry, 15(2).
  188. Qian, D. D. (2014). LTTC-GEPT. The Language Training & Testing Center.
  189. Quaglio, P. (2008). Television dialogue and natural conversation: Linguistic similarities and functional differences. In A. Ädel & R. Reppen (Eds.), Corpora and discourse: The challenges of different settings (pp. 189-210). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  190. Quaglio, P. (2009). Television dialogue: The sitcom Friends vs. natural conversation (Vol. 36). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  191. Quaglio, P. M. (2004). The language of NBC’s “Friends”: A comparison with face-to-face conversation [Doctoral dissertation, Northern Arizona University]. ProQuest Dissertations Publishing.
  192. Rashid, A., & Mahmood, M. A. (2019). Linguistic Variations across Disciplines: A Multidimensional Analysis of Pakistani Research Articles. Global Social Sciences Review, 4(1), 34-48.
  193. Rasheed, S., & Shakir, A (2015). Involved Versus Informational Production in Profit and Non-Profit Organizational Websites: A Corpus-Based Study. IISTE, 5(7), 141-148.
  194. Reppen, R. (1994). Variation in elementary student writing. [Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Northern Arizona University].
  195. Reppen, R. (2007). First language & second language writing development of elementary students. In Y. Kawaguchi, T. Takagaki, N. Tomimori & Y Tsuruga (Eds.), Corpus-based Perspectives in Linguistics (pp. 147-167). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  196. Reppen, R. (2014). Register variation in student and adult speech and writing. In S. Conrad & D. Biber (Eds.), Variation in English: Multi-dimensional studies (pp. 195-207). Routledge.
  197. Rey, J. M. (2014). Changing gender roles in popular culture: Dialogue in Star Trek episodes from 1966 to 1993. In S. Conrad & D. Biber (Eds.), Variation in English: Multi-dimensional studies (pp. 138-156). Routledge.
  198. Sardinha, T. B. (2014) 25 years later: comparing internet and pre-internet registers. In T. Berber-Sardinha & M. Veirano Pinto (Eds.) Multi-Dimensional Analysis, 25 years on: A tribute to Douglas Biber (pp. 81 – 108) John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  199. Sardinha, T. B., Kauffmann, C., & Acunzo, C. M. (2014). Dimensions of register variation in Brazilian Portuguese. In T. Berber-Sardinha & M. Veirano Pinto (Eds.) Multi-Dimensional Analysis, 25 years on: A tribute to Douglas Biber (pp. 35 – 81). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  200. Sardinha, T. B., Kauffmann, C., & Acunzo, C. M. (2014). A multi-dimensional analysis of register variation in Brazilian Portuguese. Corpora, 9(2), 239-271.
  201. Sardinha, T., & Pinto, M. (2017). American television and off-screen registers: A corpus-based comparison. Corpora, 12(1), 85-114.
  202. Sardinha, T. B., & Pinto, M. V. (2019). Dimensions of variation across American television registers. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 24(1), 3-32.
  203. Sardinha, T., & Veirano Pinto, M. (2021). A linguistic typology of American television. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 26(1), 127-160.
  204. Shakir, A., & Afsar, A. (2012). Comparing Interactive Features of Pakistani Print Ads and Conversation: A Multidimensional Approach. Kashmir Journal of Language Research, 15(2), 113-134.
  205. Shakir, M., & Deuber, D. (2018). A multidimensional study of interactive registers in Pakistani and US English. World Englishes, 37(4), 607-623.
  206. Shakir, M., & Deuber, D. (2019). A Multidimensional Analysis of Pakistani and US English blogs and columns. English World-Wide, 40(1), 1-23.
  207. Shakir, M. (2020). A corpus based comparison of variation in online registers of Pakistani English using MD analysis.[unpublished MA thesis]
  208. Shi, Y. (2015). A Corpus-based Analysis on Spoken Texts in CET4: By a Multidimensional Approach. In. B. Ma, L. Cheng, H. He, L. Hale & J. Zhang (Eds.), Proceedings of 2015 Youth Academic Forum on Linguistics, Literature, Translation and Culture (p. 106-111). The American Scholar Press, Inc.
  209. Spina, S. (2016) Le conversazioni scritte dei social media: un’analisi multidimensionale. In Francesca Bianchi, Paola Leone (Eds.). Linguaggio e apprendimento linguistico. Metodi e strumenti tecnologici. Milano: Studi AitLA (Associazione Italiana di Linguistica Applicata)
  210. Staples, S., Laflair, G. T., & Egbert, J. (2017). Comparing language use in oral proficiency interviews to target domains: Conversational, academic, and professional discourse. The Modern Language Journal, 101(1), 194-213.
  211. Staples, S., Biber, D., & Reppen, R. 2018. Using corpus-based register analysis to explore the validity of high stakes language exams: A register comparison of TOEFL iBT and disciplinary writing tasks. Modern Language Journal, 102(2), 310-332.
  212. Staples, S., Venetis, M., Robinson, J., & Dultz, R. (2020). Understanding the multidimensional nature of informational language in health care interactions. Register Studies, 2(2), 241-274.
  213. Sun, Y., & Cheng, L. (2017). Linguistic variation and legal representation in legislative discourse: A corpus-based multi-dimensional study. International Journal of Legal Discourse, 2(2), 315-339.
  214. Tasker, D. G. (2019). Situational and Linguistic Variation in Undergraduate English-Department Student Writing [Doctoral dissertation, Northern Arizona University]. ProQuest Dissertations Publishing.
  215. Thompson, P., & Hunston, S. (2019). Multi-dimensional analysis: Variation between and within journals. In P. Thompson & S. Hunston (Eds.), Interdisciplinary Research Discourse: Corpus Investigations into Environment Journals (pp. 187-215). Routledge.
  216. Thompson, P., Hunston, S., Murakami, A., & Vajn, D. (2017). Multi-dimensional analysis, text constellations, and interdisciplinary discourse. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 22(2), 153-186.
  217. Thornton, J. A. (2001). The influence of proficiency, extraversion, and inter-personal interaction on ESL writing [Doctoral dissertation, Iowa State University]. Iowa State University Digital Repository.
  218. Titak, A., & Roberson, A. (2013). Dimensions of web registers: an exploratory multi-dimensional comparison. Corpora, 8(2), 235-260.
  219. Van Rooy, B. (2008). A multidimensional analysis of student writing in Black South African English. English World-Wide, 29(3), 268-305.
  220. Van Rooy, B., & Terblanche, L. (2006). A corpus-based analysis of involved aspects of student writing. Language Matters: Studies in the Languages of Africa, 37(2), 160-182.
  221. Van Rooy, B., & Terblanche, L. (2009, January). A multi-dimensional analysis of a learner corpus. In A. Renouf & A. Kehoe (Eds.), Corpus Linguistics (pp. 239-254). Brill Rodopi.
  222. Van Rooy, B., Terblanche, L., Haase, C., & Schmied, J. (2010). Register differentiation in East African English: A multidimensional study. English World-Wide, 31(3), 311-349.
  223. Venegas, R. (2010). Multi-dimensional analysis of an academic corpus in Spanish. In G. Parodi (Ed.), Academic and professional discourse genres in Spanish (pp. 101-119). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  224. Venetis, M. K., Staples, S., Robinson, J. D., & Kearney, T. (2019). Provider information provision and breast cancer patient well-being. Health communication, 34(9), 1032-1042.
  225. Westin, I., & Geisler, C. (2002). A multi-dimensional study of diachronic variation in British newspaper editorials. Icame Journal, 26, 133-152.
  226. Weigle, S. C., & Friginal, E. (2015). Linguistic dimensions of impromptu test essays compared with successful student disciplinary writing: Effects of language background, topic, and L2 proficiency. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 18, 25-39.
  227. Werner, V. (2021). Catchy and conversational? A register analysis of pop lyrics. Corpora, 16(2), 237-270.
  228. Werner, V. (2021).A register approach toward pop lyrics in EFL education. In E. Seoane & D. Biber (Eds.), Corpus based approaches to register variation. Amsterdam: Benjamins.
  229. Wright, H. R. (2020). Stand-alone literature reviews. In U. Römer, V. Cortes & E. Friginal (Eds.) Advances in Corpus-based Research on Academic Writing(pp. 307-332). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  230. Wu, Yang and Ruan, Zhoulin, A Corpus-Based Study of Corporate Blog: A Multi-Dimensional Analysis (June 1, 2013). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2319715 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2319715
  231. Xiao, R. (2009). Multidimensional analysis and the study of world Englishes. World Englishes, 28(4), 421-450.
  232. Xiao, R., & Cao, Y. (2013). Native and non-native English abstracts in contrast: A multidimensional move analysis. Belgian Journal of Linguistics, 27(1), 111-134.
  233. Xie, S. (2020). Multidimensional analysis of Master thesis abstracts: a diachronic perspective. Scientometrics, 123 (2), 861-881. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-020-03408-6
  234. Yan, X., & Staples, S. (2019). Fitting MD analysis in an argument-based validity framework for writing assessment: Explanation and generalization inferences for the ECPE. Language Testing, 37 (2), 189 – 214.
  235. Yan, X., & Staples, S. (2016). Investigating lexico-grammatical complexity as construct validity evidence for the Examination for the Certificate of Proficiency in English (ECPE) writing tasks: A multidimensional analysis. CaMLA Working Papers.
  236. Yanchun, L., Fengguo, H., Yi, Z., & Lea, Q. (2018). Comparative Study of a Multi-Dimension/Multi-Feature Approach Between Chinese Debate and Speech. International Journal of Language and Linguistics, 6(5), 163-172.
  237. Zhang, B. (2015). Moves and inter-move linguistic variation in education research articles [Doctoral dissertation, Suranaree University of Technology]. Suranaree University of Technology Intellectual Respository,
  238. Zhang, Z. S. (2012). A corpus study of variation in written Chinese. Corpus Linguistics and Linguistic Theory, 8(1), 209-240.
  239. Zorzi, V. (2018). The Communication of Science and Technology in Online Newspapers: a Multidimensional Perspective [Doctoral dissertation, Università degli Studi di Padova]. Padova Digital University Archive.

Extensions of the method

In the past 30 years, several researchers have extended MDAs to apply to non-canonical forms of text variation, use innovative variables in an MDA or apply different statistical techniques to extract dimensions. We list these extensions here in this separate list.

  1. Biber, D., Egbert, J., & Keller, D. (2020). Reconceptualizing register in a continuous situational space. Corpus Linguistics and Linguistic Theory, 16(3), 581-616.
  2. Clarke, I., & Grieve, J. (2017, August). Dimensions of abusive language on Twitter. In Proceedings of the first workshop on abusive language online (pp. 1-10).
  3. Clarke, I., & Grieve, J. (2019). Stylistic variation on the Donald Trump Twitter account: A linguistic analysis of tweets posted between 2009 and 2018. PloS one, 14(9), e0222062.
  4. Doolan, S. M. (2020). The influence of sources on First-Year Composition L1 student writing. Advances in Corpus-based Research on Academic Writing: Effects of discipline, register, and writer expertise, 95, 89.
  5. Lima-Lopes, R. E. D. (2020). Immigration and the context of brexit: collocate network and multidimensional frameworks applied to appraisal in SFL. Muitas vozes, 9(1), 410 – 441.
  6. Sardinha, T. B. (2019). Using Multi-Dimensional Analysis to Detect Representations of National Cultures. Multi-Dimensional Analysis: Research Methods and Current Issues, 231.
  7. Zuppardi, M. C., & Sardinha, T. B. (2020). A multi-dimensional view of collocations in academic writing. Advances in Corpus-based Research on Academic Writing: Effects of discipline, register, and writer expertise, 95, 333.